Welcome to Church Crookham Garden Society

27th April 2021

A vibrant garden society active in Church Crookham, FLEET, Hampshire. We hold several annual events and shows and run a comprehensively stocked stores hut with discounts for members.


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HISTORY

Church Crookham Garden Society was formed in 1954 as the Ryelaw Garden Society. It was founded by residents of Ryelaw Road as an outlet for their interest in gardening. A potted history about the success story by founding members to cultivate the local sand can be found here…

At some time in its early stages, the Society began marketing garden supplies and until 1997 traded from sheds located in Moore Close.

The name of the Society was changed to Church Crookham Garden Society to reflect the wider residential location of its members.

Shows were organised and now two shows per year are held, one in the spring and one in late summer.


Summer 2022 Garden Society Trading Hut News

The trading shed will be open on Saturday mornings 10:00 to 11:30h until 24th September 2022.
We are hoping to recruit volunteers for the committee.  Let the secretary know if you could help in this regard.

The trading shed has been restocked as of 6th June.  Because of increased transport costs, some prices are higher.

Trading Hut, Church Crookham Memorial Hall, Sandy Lane, GU52 8LD, (opposite the Wyvern pub).

Click here to view/download June 14th 2022 Shed Price List


In 1997 the ground occupied by the Society’s sheds was subject to planning consent for residential building and the Society moved to a purpose built concrete structure located in the car park of the Crookham Memorial Hall in Sandy Lane, Church Crookham.

The Society is run by two committees:

  • Main committee
  • Show committee

Each committee is made up of elected members, and is chaired by the Society Chairman.

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June gardening Tips

7th June 2022

There are jobs that must be done in hope of kind weather continuing… Here are some suggestions: Ornamental garden

  • Gently remove spent flowers from Camellia and rhododendrons to make room for the leaf buds emerging behind. You can also trim back overgrown shoots to make the shrubs more compact, next year’s flower buds will form on the new growth of side shoots that this stimulates.
  • Divide bearded irises after flowering; plant with the rhizomes facing south.
  • Sow biennials like sweet William, viola and wallflowers
  • Divide spring-flowering bulbs.
  • Remove spent flower heads of Euphorbia by cutting flowered stems to ground level. Wear gloves for this, the sap causes skin irritation.

Lawns

  • Mow regularly but, if it is hot and dry, raise the cutting height.
  • Apply a high-nitrogen lawn feed (again, not when dry)
  • Add clippings to the compost heap in small amounts; mix them with dry material to stop it all going slimy.

Kitchen garden

  • Pinch out side-shoots of cordon tomatoes
  • Plant out pumpkins, squashes, courgettes and beans. You could direct sow both these and sweetcorn.
  • Because sweetcorn is wind pollinated, do not plant them in a row but in a block, so the pollen gets to the stigmas of neighbouring plants.
  • Harvest early potatoes when they begin flowering
  • Sow autumn carrots.
  • Net strawberries and brassicas against birds.
  • Sorry! But stop cutting asparagus and feed it, so the crowns are ready for next year


2022 Open Gardens

Open Gardens Poster pdf

Open Gardens Poster

Phyllis Tuckwell’s Open Gardens scheme is taking place this Summer? They are currently looking for more local residents who would consider opening their garden to support the hospice.

Why not open your garden to friends and family, or join their public 2022 Open Gardens campaign, and help raise money for local Hospice Care. Contact details are on the full size poster (click here) ready to print.


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May 2022 gardening Tips

29th April 2022

This year, April and March seemed to swap places in terms of weather, so Magnolias and Camellias were in peak bloom and then ‘browned off’ by frost in my garden. The daffodils, primroses and hyacinths have been more resilient and given a very good show.

Everything else is later than usual – slower to germinate and leaves reluctant to expose themselves to frost.

By the time you read this, though, in May.  It will be greener and maybe warmer and you can get on with some of these tasks…

Kitchen garden

  • Earth up potatoes when the foliage reaches 23cm/9in to prevent green tubers or, if frost is expected, cover smaller sprouts with soil for protection.
  • Sow carrots, radishes, beetroot, lettuce and spring onions for successional harvesting.
  • Harden off courgette and squash plants that were started under glass and protect with cloches or fleece if cold nights are forecast
  • Start to harvest asparagus spears
  • Direct sow French beans and sweet corn.

Ornamental garden

  • Prune overgrown Camellia to young side shoots which will flower next year.
  • Prune Forsythia and Philadelphus as flowering finishes
  • Remove a third of old wood on Spiraea to open up the bush
  • Dead head Rhododendron to make room for new growth
  • Plant out Dahlias and Cannas
  • Dead head spring bulbs but LEAVE THE LEAVES to feed the bulbs until they die back. If daffodils did not flower well, lift and divide the clumps.
  • Take soft wood cuttings of Fuchsia, Anthemis, pelargonium and verbena.
  • Support tall and heavy-headed perennials with pea sticks or special supports
  • At the end of May, do the ‘Chelsea chop’ on late flowering herbaceous plants like sedum (Hylotelephium) that tend to flop outwards. The flowers may be later but they will be sturdier. Other suitable plants are Chrysanthemum, Helenium, Helianthus, Monarda, Phlox, Rudbeckia and VeronicastrumDo not chop lupins, irises, paeonies, acanthus or Hemoracallis

Open Gardens

Beechenwood Farm, Odiham RG29 1JA: open every Wednesday 30th March – 8th June (2-5) also Monday 2nd May (2-5)

Brick Kiln Cottage, Herriard RG25 2PR: open on Saturday 7th, Sunday 15th May (11.30 – 4.00)

‘Selborne’, East Worldham, Alton GU34 3AE: open 28th,29th May and again in July

 

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